Book Review- Flawed (by Cecelia Ahern)

 

NOTE: Some spoilers.

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I chose this book because a close friend gave it to me for my birthday. Thank you, Isis! ❤

This book is a typical teenage, romantic, futuristic dystopian novel, with a little more gore than its sisters. It’s one of those books no one can despise reading when it’s almost time for summer. This book is about Celestine North, a role model to everyone, and the perfect daughter. She lives in a society where the Flawed Court of “Justice,” takes control of everyone. The court is ruled by the Guild: The Hunger Games‘ “Capitol,” the Matched trilogy’s “Society,” etc. The Guild takes care of trials in this Flawed Court. If you are found to be “flawed” in any way, you are sent to court where, if found guilty, will be branded depending on how you are flawed. The five known places where you can get branded are your chest, right over your heart; your tongue, hand, the sole of your foot, and your temple, with an “F”. Like Divergent‘s “factionless,” the “Flawed” are outcasts in society, and Celestine detests them like everyone else.

After Celestine’s neighbor/beloved piano teacher is taken to the Flawed Court and is certain to be branded for taking a loved one out of the government’s control and giving that person a medicine that the Flawed Court does not allow, Celestine begins to question everything she was taught about the Flawed. At first, she is disgusted that someone so close to her could be flawed, then, she begins to wonder if it is the system that is flawed.

One day, as Celestine rides the bus to school with sister and her boyfriend, the son of the head judge of the Guild, she notices two unflawed, or “normal” people, sitting in the meager two seats for the Flawed, and an old, flawed man standing up and coughing hard. After minutes go by and tension builds up, she decides to help the man into a seat. She stands up and talks to the two unflawed ladies busy chatting and not kind enough to care about the man hacking away about two feet away. Celestine talks to the ladies and tries to persuade them to get up, then proceeds to help the man into the seat. Someone calls for the Peacekeepers -cough cough- I mean, the Whistleblowers, and they come to take the man…no, Celestine away for “assisting the Flawed.” Celestine finds herself in a blank, white cell, with no one next to her but a pacing, angry boy in the cell adjacent to hers. Bosco, the head of the Guild and her boyfriend’s father, is very understanding and helps her formulate a story so she would not be deemed flawed. The fake story goes that Celestine was doing a community service by trying to save the women from getting coughed on and wasn’t actually helping the man directly. Celestine had friends and family vouch for her and the judges had complete faith in her…until she told the truth in front of the whole court: that she had helped a flawed man. Celestine endured the most brands in all of Flawed history, she got all five, plus one that a judge had given without permission or anesthetic. She was pushed out of society and made fun of. Eventually, she learned to love herself and was able to fight back and start many riots.

One of the characters in this book is Bosco. Formally known as Judge Crevan, Bosco is the head judge of the guild, and the father of Art, Celestine’s boyfriend. Celestine and Bosco were good friends until Celestine told the truth to the court when Bosco had lied for her. Bosco was also the judge who gave her a 6th brand at the base of her spine, for being “flawed to the core,” without anesthetic. Because of all this, I would not want to meet this inhumane excuse of a human. I feel so much anger toward Bosco and how he maintains a good face to all the people under his control. The only reason I would want to meet him would be if I wanted to seriously injure him or…kill him.

Although the ending is an annoying cliffhanger, this book is fantastic. Flawed is definitely a page turner. The character development is a little bit fast for my taste, but I guess it shows how someone’s humanity can come forward at any given moment. The writing style itself wasn’t anything special, but the story/plot was fantastic.

This book is similar to Divergent, Matched and The Hunger Games. It is similar to Divergent because Flawed people are like factionless people, they are outcasts. Flawed is similar to Matched and The Hunger Games because there is a Society-type-thing overruling everything. I could honestly relate this book to any book about an evil society set in a dystopian-like place aimed at interesting teenagers with romance and rebellion.

I think the theme of this book is where society is heading and to love yourself. I think the author feels like people are losing their humanity, and consciousness. I think Ahern also wants us to be aware of our flaws and know that they are there for a reason and that they help us grow and mature. Cecilia Ahern wants us not to be prone to public shaming and to be proud of who we are.

Questions Answered:

  • 1. Why did you choose this book?
  • 2. Explain the plot of the book, or if it is a non-fiction book, what topics are covered.
  • 3. Describe one of the characters in the book. Would you want to meet this character? Why or why not?
  • 4. What is your opinion of the book? Would you recommend it? Why or why not?
  • 5. Explain how this book is similar to another book, film, story, or article that you have read or seen. What connections or comparisons can you make?
  • 6. What do you think the main idea or theme of this story is? What is the author trying to tell you about life or our world with this book? 

 

Thanks for reading!:)Please check out some of my other posts to get good reading suggestions. Feel free to comment below!

 

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